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Private Edward W Capstick

 
 

Harrogate Herald - 18th April 1917

Letters

Trooper E W Capstick writes : 

It is over six months since I left Blighty, and I am now quite hardened to active service. Not that we have had it rough by any means; in fact, under the circumstances we have been comfortably situated. Being at the base remount depot is one better than up the line. We are having a delightful spell of weather just now, positively glorious. A new YMCA marquee has opened in the vicinity of our camp; it is most beneficial both from the recreation and spiritual point of view.

 

Harrogate Herald - 30th May 1917

Letters

Gunner R Ramsden, writing from Salonica, says : 

I could not write and thank you before, as I have been laid up with fever, and am at present on a hospital ship getting a little sea air just to get me up again. I had a letter from Private Capstick, whom you gave my address to a few weeks ago, and I hope to be able to see him when I go to the convalescent camp.

 

Harrogate Heradl - 1st August 1917

W H Breare letter

I have heard a good deal about Telegraphist J A Capstick, who is in the Navy, through his father. I am happy to say the lad called in to see me the other day, whilst he was on thirteen days leave. Amongst other things he told me was that Petty Officer Dobson is a gun layer in his lot, and that he, Capstick, has been on board ship for two years uninterruptedly. He is the son of Mr & Mrs Edward Capstick, of 16 Glebe Road, Harrogate. He has a brother (Edward Capstick, the third son), who is in Salonica, and his eldest brother Ernest Capstick is in the REs. Capstick was as breezy and jolly as the rest of our tars, and I had a pleasant time with him.

 

Harrogate Herald - 17th October 1917

W H Breare letter

Mr & Mrs E Capstick, of 16 Glebe Road, have recently had an anxious three weeks. Their son, Private Ted Capstick, of the Yorkshire Hussars, attached to the Derbyshire Yeomanry, is out Salonica way. One day they received a telegram from the Front saying that their boy was dangerously ill with malaria. After an interval of a week a second intimation came saying that Capstick was still dangerously ill. Another week's delay brought a further intimation that he was still dangerously ill. Then came the joyful message that he was out of danger. The latter was worth waiting for, was it not?

 

Harrogate Herald - 30th January 1918

Letters

E W Capstick, writing under date December 31st, 1917, says : 

Just a few more lines to tell you a little of my progress. To use the Army expression I am still in "dock". Pleased to say I am gradually picking up, but I am not near so strong as I was previous to my illness. Christmas is now nicely over, and it is now practically the eve of New Year. In regard to Christmas I sincerely trust that you have had an immensely enjoyable time. I know I have spent a top-hole Christmas. We received every comfort possible. The dinner and tea on Christmas Day were absolutely ripping - a scrumptious repast I shall never forget in my Army career. Boxing Day was awful cold in contrast to the previous day. In the afternoon the hospital authorities kindly privileged quite a large number of us to witness a football match between teams representing the Army and Navy. Lots of the one-time professional footballers of good old Blighty days were playing, so you can pretty well imagine what an absolutely glorious match it was. During the interval Corporal Applegarth, the world's champion runner, gave a clever exhibition of hundred yards flat racing. Several officers of high rank, both of the Army and Navy, and lots of ladies were also in evidence. We have had heaps of concerts in the hospital; talented artistes were numerous. PS - I have not received one of your papers since July. [Will Capstick's friends let us have his latest address - Ed]

 

Harrogate Herald - 30th January 1918

Letters

E W Capstick says : 

I am improving as well as can be expected. I am still in hospital, and likely to be over Christmas, which will not be at all bad. I am sure it will be a contrast to the Christmas I spent last year up the line - bully beef and biscuits for dinner. We get our Christmas pudding and turkey, etc., somewhere about the New Year. Better late than never. I wish you the happiest of time this year, and of course every good wish for the welfare of your paper during the coming year. We are making the wards looks as cheery as possible by decorating, etc. it was with deep regret that I heard of young Byers being killed in action, I am sure the loss to his people must be irreparable. I am awfully sorry, for he was quite a chum of mine in civilian life.

 

Harrogate Herald - 27th February 1918

E W Capstick says : 

You will be surprised to hear that I am still experiencing hospital life and only progressing moderately. Some fellows would be frightfully bored having such a long period. There is certainly definite improvement in my general health. I am looking well and feel heaps stronger, although I have far from regained my former strength. My case does not seem to yield to any treatment; so you see my only trouble now is the incessant irritation of my complaint. I witnessed a rather amusing thing the other day. One of our Italian soldiers was in difficulties with a goat. The little beast refused to be led, so the only alternative was to let it walk between his legs. When it broke into a somewhat faster step, it was very comical. The last few days I have been greatly troubled with my teeth, giving me excruciating pain. I thought it advisable to see the dentist, so I visited him this morning. He extracted six, and I feel in a somewhat despondent mood at present. Until this morning I had no conception it was so easy to have them drawn. I had awful horrors of the ordeal facing me. Now that is over I feel exceedingly thankful. This is a ripping hospital, situated amidst ideal surroundings, certainly more congenial than up the line.

 

Harrogate Herald 29th January 1919

Trooper E W Capstick writes : 

I am amazed at the courtesy and kindness of the people whom I am billeted with. A topping feather bed makes it quite reciprocal to home life. Shall greatly look forward to your paper coming up here.

 

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