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Private Harry Lee Hughes

 
 

Harrogate Herald - 7th February 1917

Roll of Honour

Private Harry Lee Hughes, West Yorks, whose portrait appears in another page, son of Mr & Mrs C E Hughes, of Crown Place, Harrogate, is in hospital in France from illness and shock. He has been some months at the Front, and has experienced one or two narrow escapes. His last one, from which he is still feeling the effects, occurred two or three weeks ago. He, with three other comrades, were resting in a dugout when it was blown up by heavy German shell. Private Hughes was the only one of the four to escape with his life. In addition to the shock, he was severely bruised, and is also suffering from colic and frost bite, but we understand is doing well.

 

Harrogate Herald - 2nd May 1917

H L Hughes writes : 

Just a line to say that I am keeping well, and hope this letter will find you the same. I am afraid I haven't much news to tell you this time, for as you will know, things are going wit a swing out here at present, and I am sure this rotten war won't last much longer now, for the lads are giving the Huns what they deserve, and no mistake, as are the French. I can assure you I do not envy Fritz. The weather has been much better lately, which, of course, makes things better for us in every way. Thanking you for the regular receiving of the Herald.

 

Harrogate Herald - 6th June 1917

Roll of Honour

We regret to hear that on Friday Private Harry Lee Hughes, son of Mr C E Hughes, fruiterer, of Crown Place, Harrogate, was officially reported missing. It will be almost five weeks since Mr and Mrs Hughes received their last letter from Harry, but that is nothing unusual with the busy times on the Western Front, and better news will no doubt be received. Private Hughes joined up on the 19th January, 1916. He soon showed his capabilities with the rifle, and has since done splendid service. He received his first training with the 4th West Yorks, and was afterwards transferred to the 15th West Yorks (Leeds Pals), and has been at the Front a considerable period, during which he had been in hospital suffering from illness and shock owing to a shell blowing up his dugout, when he had a very lucky escape.

 

Harrogate Herald - 20th June 1917

Roll of Honour

Private Harry Lee Hughes (West Yorks), son of Mr and Mrs C E Hughes, of Crown Place, Harrogate, who has been reported missing since May, has now been officially reported a prisoner of war at Cassel, Germany.

 

Harrogate herald - 20th June 1917

Roll of Honour

Mr and Mrs Archer, of 9 Pearl Street, Starbeck, were greatly relieved and pleased to receive a post-card on Tuesday morning, stating that their son, Private W Archer (West Yorks), was a prisoner in Cassel, Germany. He has been wounded in the right wrist, and is in hospital. Private H L Hughes, son of Mr Hughes, Crown Place, Harrogate, and Private J R Petch (WY), son of Mr and Mrs Petch, 117 Regent Avenue, Harrogate, are also prisoners at Cassel.

 

Harrogate Herald - 20th June 1917

W H Breare letter

News has just come that Private H L Hughes, son of Mr Hughes, fruiterer, Crown Place, is also a prisoner at the same place as Petch - Cassel, Germany. It is with relief we have also heard word has come from Private W Archer, who was wounded in action, as is in hospital in Germany, a prisoner at the same place. His home address is 9 Pearl Street, Starbeck.

W H Breare letter

I had the pleasure of a visit from the father of Private Harry L Hughes, whom I mention as a prisoner of war in Germany in another part of this letter. I ascertained from Mr Hughes that his son had been wounded in the right leg by shrapnel; so that accounts for him having been taken prisoner. I am delighted things have turned out so well for him and others, likewise grateful that he should have asked his father in the first postcard from his German prison, so promptly to let me know.

 

Harrogate Herald - 4th July 1917

Roll of Honour

Private H L Hughes (West Yorks), who, as previously stated, is a prisoner of war at Cassel, Germany, has been able to write home to his parents, Mr & Mrs C B Hughes, of Crown Place. He had been wounded by shrapnel in the leg, but is now much better and going on all right. He wishes to be remembered to all his old Harrogate friends.

 

Harrogate Herald - 29th August 1917

Private H L Hughes writes from Cassell, Germany, to his mother, Crown Place, Harrogate, in a cheerful strain, and says he is keeping well and that his wound is nearly better and expects to be out working by the time they receive this letter.

 

Harrogate Herald - 5th September 1917

Private Harry Lee Hughes, writing from the camp of prisoners of War, Cossel, Germany, to Mr W H Breare, says : 

Just a line to let you know I am quite well. No doubt you would be surprised to hear about my being captured, still I am lucky to be alive at all, for it was a terrible affair. I am glad to say my wound is practically well again now. Shall have to close now, hoping this will find you in the best of health, and again wishing you and the Herald every success.

 

Harrogate Herald - 26th September 1917

Roll of Honour

Private H L Hughes, West Yorks Regiment, son of Mr & Mrs C E Hughes, of 1 Crown Place, Harrogate, writes from the camp at Cassel, Germany, that he is now quite well, and has recovered from his wound.

 

Harrogate Herald - 1st January 1919

Wednesday Gossip - I must not forget to acknowledge the great assistance I received from Mr Hughes, of 1 Crown Place, [Mr C E Hughes : Hughes & Sons, fruiterers and florists] in connection with the prisoners in Germany. Having a knowledge of the Fatherland and a son captured early on in the war, he took a great interest, not only in his own, but other boys, and many parents in Harrogate, I am sure, will be grateful for what he did for them. He made quite a hobby of this business, and not only put them in the way of sending food, tobacco, and money to their boys in German camps, but would draft and even write letters for parents who were unaccustomed to such work, and put them in touch with the proper Care Committees in the quickest way possible, thus alleviating a great deal of anxiety.

 

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