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Sergeant Fred Lowrey

 
 

Claro Times - 23rd January 1915

Photos - Seaman James Conning, HMS Thunderer, and Private F Lowrey, Royal Army Medical Corps (who has been taken prisoner), both of whom have homes in Harrogate.

 

Harrogate Herald - 20th January 1915

Private Fred Lowrey, Royal Army Medical Corps, son of Mrs J W Lowrey, 21 Bower Road, Harrogate, who was a reservist, went out to the Front in August and was captured at Mons. He is now a prisoner in the French Camp, at Sennelager, via Paderborn, Germany. His parents have received postcards from him, when he has invariably made requests for food, and they have regularly sent packages which have been duly received by him up to the present.

 

Claro Times - 23rd January 1915

Private Fred Lowrey, Royal Army Medical Corps, son of Mr J W Lowrey, 21 Bower Road, Harrogate, who was a reservist, went out to the Front in August, and was made a prisoner at Mons, and is now a prisoner in the French Camp, at Sennelager, via Paderborn, Germany. In letters to his parents, he has invariably made requests for food, and they have regularly sent packages which have been duly received by him up to the present.

 

Claro Times - 23rd January 1915

Private Fred Lowrey, of 21 Bower Road, Harrogate, whose photograph we reproduce this week, is a prisoner of war. He joined the Royal Army Medical Corps some five years ago, and after serving three years was eighteen months on the reserve. Formerly he was employed at the Prince of Wales Hotel, Harrogate, but on the outbreak of war he was employed at a hotel in Skegness. He was immediately called up, and within a few days he went to France. Since he went abroad nothing was heard of him until his parents received a postcard stating that he had been taken prisoner. It was believed he was captured at Mons. His father, Mr J W Lowrey, was eight years in the Volunteers.

Since Private Lowrey was taken prisoner, several postcards have been received from him by his parents.

In one of these he acknowledges a parcel, and with reference to his request for other things, he adds :

"You will no doubt think I am asking for a lot, but you do not know how long I may require them. I know that things are quiet at home, but I shall be able to lighten affairs when I come back - God knows when that will be. I want you to keep sending something to eat every week if you can possibly do so. Megginson was with me up to the time I was captured, but I have not seen him since. I want you to thank all the Opera House staff for what they have done. Wishing you all a happy and prosperous new year, Fred".

Another postcard states that his parents need not be afraid to send things as long as they were packed in wood or tin boxes. "We heard a few days ago", he says, "that some Royal Army Medical Corps men had gone home, but we do not know anything for sure. 'Buckey', of the Old Boys, is here".

The postcards are profusely printed with instructions, for the most part in German, but with a direction in English that reply is to be made by postcard only. There are impressions of rubber stamps in German, and on the face of one of the cards is printed the address of the writer, viz., Germany, Sennelager bei Paderborn. We may also mention that Mr Lowrey was a former page at the Harrogate Opera House.

 

Harrogate Herald - 9th January 1918

W H Breare letter

Sergeant Fred Lowrey, son of Mr J W Lowrey, of Bower Road, who was on the reserve and rejoined on August 5th, was captured at Mons a few hours after the war commenced, but was subsequently released, and I believe is now in Egypt in a Camel Corps.

 

Harrogate Herald - 16th January 1918

W H Breare letter

"If the letters miscarry the Heralds arrive regularly!" This is an extract sent me by Sergeant Fred Lowrey, son of Mr J W Lowrey, thanking me for his papers. Of course, I am sorry that letters occasionally miss, but I confess I am delighted with the regularity that the Heralds reach the boys. I have long known that the postal authorities take great pains to forward them safely and promptly, but it is nice to have this further reassurance. I am sure all those patriotic, volunteer ladies who address the covers and help us wrap up the Heralds will share my satisfaction. I have not mentioned these good friends to you for a long time, but ever since they have been regular and assiduous in helping. I know that in your minds and hearts you thank them. I have often thought that I should like to get photographs of the busy scenes in the two rooms where the ladies are working. I should like to see them some time in the Herald. I am not losing sight of it, and if possible will have it done.

Lowrey, of whom I have been speaking, you may remember, was one of the Harrogate men captured at Mons a few hours after the war commenced. He was subsequently released, and went out to Egypt. It is from this sunny clime he has written me the words quoted above.

 

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