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Private Arthur Rushworth

 
 

Harrogate Herald  3rd January 1917

Letters

Private Arthur Rushworth writes from hospital : 

Dear Sir, I now take the opportunity of writing you a few lines to thank you for your great kindness in forwarding your valued Herald, which, you can believe me, is very much appreciated. I have spent just over a month in a gentleman's hall, I can honestly say that I have never enjoyed myself in my life before as I have done while being there, and I shall never forget the great kindness shown to me by numerous friends during the time I have been in Blighty. I shall probably be coming on my ten days' sick leave, commencing the day after New Year's Day, and I will call and have a little chat with you if you do not mind. Before closing my short epistle, I must not omit my very best wishes for a happy and prosperous New Year and for the prosperity of your valued local Herald during the forthcoming year. Again thanking you for past favours.

 

Harrogate Herald - 3rd January 1917

W H Breare letter

I have had a letter from Private Arthur Rushworth saying that he is coming on leave after New Year's Day. He will call to see me and have a little chat. he sends best wishes to his friends for a happy and prosperous New Year.

 

Harrogate Herald - 17th January 1917

Letters

Private Arthur Rushworth says : 

I am at present billeted at Whitley Bay, along with the -rd West Yorks. I have seen several local men here, also many of my chums, who were with me in the Bradford Pals while at the Front. I expect I shall be going to the war for a second time in about a month or so. I have always been cheerful and looked on the bright side of things during war time, and that probably accounts for my luck, as I have never had a scratch on me, but I have had several narrow escapes. Nobody can tell when their end is near on the battlefield. I will bring my short epistle to a close, hoping these few lines will find you in the best of health. Thanking you for past favours.

 

Harrogate Herald - 31st January 1917

Letters

The following are men who have sent us the Army post-card briefly stating that they are well and have received papers and parcels, or whose letters contain views that have repeatedly been expressed by other correspondents, but show their friends that they are all right :

Private A Rushworth

 

Harrogate Herald - 4th April 1917

Private Arthur Rushworth writes : 

I have particularly noticed that war work has done much improvement towards our girls, both physically and mentally. It is a sheer delight to note the healthy tan and clear eyes of the conductress, the fine physique of the land workers, and the embodiment of health and spirits as represented by other workers alike. In the past women stayed indoors far too much, and the result was many tired, listless-looking women who were never over-anxious to take active exercise out of doors, which proves that open-air existence is essential to health and happiness. I wish Harrogatonians during the present crisis would try and keep cheerful. I know it is an exceedingly difficult task for parents who have lost their dearly beloved heroes whilst doing their duty for God, King, and country, but I will give them a motto : "Cheerfulness is an excellent wearing quantity. It has been called the bright weather of the heart". Hoping you are in the best of health. With kindest regards to all my friends in Sulphurland and overseas, also good luck to the boys who are following the path to glory.

 

Harrogate Herald - 18th April 1917

Letters

Private Arthur Rushworth writes : 

Just a line to say that I go to the Front shortly for the second time, after being invalided to dear old Blighty with trench fever, which is a most terrible fever. I am glad to say that I am going out with a large party of grand, jolly Yorkshire boys, all of whom have done their bit in the trenches. By Jove! It is so nice when you have friends that you adore, because you go out to the war zone with a bright heart, which is the best policy. Because there are better days in store and always will be. Keep smiling.

In another letter Private Rushworth says : 

Since I was invalided to dear old England through illness last October I can truthfully say that I was treated with the utmost kindness by the hospital and convalescent home staffs, and I have made the acquaintance of numerous kind friends in Sheffield, Barnsley, and Northumberland. The ladies of the YMCA here have especially been more than kind to me, and I intend rewarding them some day by contributing a sketch in their autograph books in remembrance of me and for their great kindness shown to me. By the way, all my new friends are exceedingly sorry that I am going overseas again, but friends who highly respect me naturally makes me inclined to go out again with a smiling face and a good heart. I shall never forget them, and I intend if I am spared to visit them all some day.

In a further communication Private Rushworth announces that he and his comrades had a glorious send-off to the Front.

 

Harrogate Herald - 16th May 1917

"The Brave West Yorks"

Raise a cheer and a shout, send hurrahs through the air,
For the lads that are going to the Front - or somewhere;
Blithe lads and true-hearted, no swagger for show,
But spare them your doubts, they will not spare the foe.

Make a long khaki line; clear the way; here they come;
See them swing to the tune, hear them step to the drum.
Our elders may boast of the "old Volunteers",
But our children shall learn of the brave Yorksheers.

Cheer again; let them know we are proud of them all,
For these are not shirkers - they came at the call;
From the pit and the workshop, or counter they came,
To shoulder the rifle, and play to the game.

No picnic their training - march, drill and parade,
Hard bed or scant fare - bread and jam, not home-made;
But as Tommy steps out to bid twenty "goodbyes",
There is health on his cheeks and a smile in his eyes.

There's mother and sisters and sweetheart - the dears!
How can they expect a good lad hide his tears?
But he runs to his place and steps out with the rest,
They're all canny lads, an' you can't pick the best.

Ah! The sin and the shame that these bonny brave boys
Should be thrown to the Molach of War, as but toys,
To be broken, or scattered like chaff from the flail;
Well might mothers pray that peace should prevail.

But if country and conscious and King bid them "go",
They go with our blessing - we cannot say "No".
So here's to our "pals", give them three ringing cheers,
These lads of Yorkshire, those brave volunteers.

Private Arthur Rushworth, West Yorks

 

Harrogate Herald - 23rd May 1917

Letters

Private Arthur Rushworth, who has gone to the Front for a second time, says : 

When I was out in France last year I always carried a piece of white heather, which I believe has brought me luck, and this time I have in my possession a small black cat charm, which a lady presented to me, and I guarantee that this small novelty will give me luck again, as I am a great believer in fate. I have seen several local comrades here, and, by Jove!, we all are so delighted to meet each other.

 

Harrogate Herald - 30th May 1917

The following are men who have sent us the Army post-card briefly stating that they are well and have received papers and parcels, or whose letters contain views that have repeatedly been expressed by other correspondents, but show their friends that they are all right :

Private Arthur Rushworth

 

Harrogate Herald - 20th June 1917

Letters

Private Arthur Rushworth writes : 

I have been before a medical board, and the medical specialists have marked me unfit for further duty in the trenches, as in days gone by, but nevertheless I am going to do further duty for God, King and country by guarding German prisoners. I trust Harrogate will have a prosperous season, which naturally should save the pockets of the residents of the bonny Sulphurland town. I advise all Sulphurlanders to keep smiling, as I have always done, because life is sweet all the world over, whether in wartime or peace time. I often think about the bereaved people who have lost loved ones, and they have my deepest sympathy.

 

Harrogate Herald - 16th January 1918

"Going Home"

Well, old West Yorkie, glad to see yer! Strange meeting yer around!
Ain't it funny ter come across yer in a transport homeward bound?
Guess a liner couldn't travel fast enough for me, yer knows;
Don't you think the old gal simply dawdles? Ain't her engines running slow? 

No man's land is just a bit unhealthy when the shells are bursting near,
While the vicious Boche bullets come a-whizzing past yer ear;
When the squelchy trenches gather all the mud in sunny France,
And yer leave yer boots behind yer as yer struggle to advance!

Mary Jane will be glad to see me when we reach the other side,
Sarah Ann will run to meet me with a smile of loving pride;
How yer eyes will shine and sparkle, like the sunshine on the sea!
And her lips will give the message that they always hold for me. 

Bless her little heart. It's worth the danger and the strain,
When there's one who waits and watches until I return again;
That is land before us, surely? We are heading for it fast.
Look, West Yorkie, look! It's Blighty! Blighty! We are home again at last!


Private Arthur Rushworth

 

Harrogate Herald - 16th January 1918

Letters

Private Arthur Rushworth writes : 

I hope all Harrogatonians have had a pleasant Christmastide, considering the present-day crisis. I know there is enough gloom in the world, but nevertheless amid the darkness there is evidence of better days in store, which will not be very long now I hope. I will conclude wishing all our brave lads overseas the best of luck, also the residents of our bonny inland watering town the same for the New Year, and may peace be proclaimed during the forthcoming year. "Keep smiling". PS - I have just seen some wild boars looking for food in the snow.

Private Arthur Rushworth expresses the hope that the people of our most beautiful inland watering-place have had a pleasant Christmastide. The brave lads overseas, he adds, have to go on as usual, every day alike. The old saying. "East, West, home's best", finds a very ready echo in the heart at Christmas time. He puts in a plea to keep the lives of the children sweet, fresh and sunny, and his PS is "Keep smiling, which is the best policy".

 

Harrogate Herald - 20th March 1918

Private Arthur Rushworth writes : 

Luck has been with me wherever I have been. I hope all my friends will keep smiling, because :
The darkest clouds are passing,
Our victory is sure,
And that for which we're striving
A peace that will endure.
So do not get downhearted,
Although the road seems long,
Take Tommy's cure for worry,
Dispel it with a song.

God grant your loved ones a safe and speedy return to dear old Blighty. Again thanking you for past favours.

 

Harrogate Herald - 17th April 1918

Following have sent postcards thanking for the Herald and briefly stating they are well :

Private Arthur Rushworth

 

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