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Major Rupert Victor Simpson

 
 

Claro Times - 29th October 1915

Major Rupert Victor Simpson, 43rd Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, the fifth surviving son of the late Mr C H Simpson, of Moor Top House, Ackworth, and The Hemploe, Rugby, and Mrs Simpson, The Haven, West Cliffe Grove, Harrogate, and brother of Colonel Simpson, OC Yorkshire Dragoons, has been killed in action in the Persian Gulf operations. He was educated at Mr Roscoe's School, Harrogate. He then went to Eton, and was captain of his house and house football, eleven. He was very successful in athletics, and when he went to Sandhurst he won the silver medal as champion athlete in 1899. Major Simpson was gazetted Second Lieutenant in January, 1900, promoted Captain in December, 1908, and obtained his majority in September last. He was appointed adjutant of his regiment in May, 1910. at the outbreak of war he was serving in India, and was sent with the 6th Expeditionary Force to the Persian Gulf. He had previously seen service in South Africa, 1899-1902, for which he received the Queen's Medal with two clasps.

 

The Cereal - Oatlands School Magazine - January 1924 - Page 98

Photo - Major Rupert Victor Simpson, born January 16th, 1880; killed in action at Kut-East Lancs-Amara, September 28th, 1915; was the seventh son of the late Charles Henry Simpson, of Moor Top House, Ackworth and "The Hemploe", Rugby.

He entered the school in September, 1890, and afterwards passed into Eton in January, 1895, where he was Head of his House and Captain of the Football XI, and became very successful in athletics. On leaving school in 1899, he entered the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, where he won the silver medal as champion athlete in 1899. gazetted as Second Lieutenant in January, 1900, in the 43rd Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, promoted Captain in December, 1908, he obtained his majority the month he was killed. He was appointed Adjutant of his regiment in May, 1910. At the outbreak of war he was serving in India, and was sent withy the 6th Poona Division of the Indian Expeditionary Force to the Persian Gulf. He had previously seen service in South Africa, 1899 to 1902, for which he received the Queen's medal with three clasps, and the King's medal with two clasps.

In a letter from the Front, a Private wrote to say that all their commanders had heartily thanked them for their good work and dogged endurance. He went on to say that their officers had been splendid, but deeply regretted that one of the best and bravest, Major Simpson, had been killed.

 

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