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Private Kenneth F Taylor

 
 

Harrogate Herald - 1st December 1915

Receiving the Herald :

Private Kenneth F Taylor, 010577, 12 Company, Army Ordnance Corps, British Expeditionary Force, France.

 

Harrogate Herald - 1st December 1915

Other photographs we reproduce today are those of F G Andrews, son of Mr and Mrs F C Andrews, of Esplanade Cottages, Harrogate. He is an apprentice on SS Beemah, of the Merchant Service, which is on a trip to South America; Trooper O Atkinson, Yorkshire Dragoons, son of Mr Atkinson, of Oatlands Mount, Harrogate, who is coachman to Captain Whitworth, of Leadhall Lane, Harrogate; he is in training in Harrogate. Private C Twineham, signaller 3/5th West Yorks; M Narsy, OS, RND; C L Brennan, OS, HMS Victory; and Private Kenneth F Taylor, of the Army Ordnance Corps, and with the British Expeditionary Force in France.

 

Harrogate Herald - 1st December 1915

Photo Page

Local Lads on Active Service.

Private K F Taylor, AOG

 

Harrogate Herald - 3rd January 1917

Letters

The following are men who have sent us the Army post-card briefly stating that they are well and have received papers and parcels, or whose letters contain views that have repeatedly been expressed by other correspondents, but show their friends that they are all right :

Private K Taylor (Season's greetings)

 

Harrogate Herald - 24th January 1917

Letters

Gunner R Ramsden writes : 

Once again I have the pleasure of writing to thank you for the Herald, which I received last night. Well, I will just tell you how we spent our Christmas here. No doubt it will interest you. In the first place it was a good time for us. We had practically the same as most people in Blighty; in fact, it was one gorge from 8am until 12pm. It was quite the extreme of last Xmas, which was one I shall never forget. We had a sing-song, which reminded one of a lot of schoolboys just broken up for summer holidays, and taking it all round it was a jolly good day. Now "our friends across the way" did not approve of Christmas Day, as they were throwing scrap iron about all day. Of course we treated it with silent contempt for the time being, but on Boxing Day we replied with the zeal of the British artillery. One of our infantry bands played in front of the wire entanglements early in the morning, but the Christmas carols must have roused their anger. As there are no church bells about here, we could not ring the old year out or the New Year in, so we blazed away with guns from five minutes to twelve until five minutes past, just to show them we had let the old year go out fighting and the New Year enter with the same spirit. Someone has been kind enough to provide us with a gramophone and records, and we are having music all day. By the way, we should all be pleased if at any time you get a few records on hand if you would remember us. We have a big dugout which is likely to be snowed up by the first snowstorm, which won't be long, as the hills in front of us are covered now, and we are expecting it any time. The winter here does not start until the middle of January, and lasts until May. In fact, we had a snowstorm in June last year - and they are winters, too, aided by a strong north wind. It reminds me of being round the North Pole or somewhere up in that district. Hills are covered, plains are covered, and everything is as desolate as some unexplored country. I suppose Christmas was a quiet time this year, and I hope by next Christmas that the war is over and all the boys at home (or someone else's home). I am writing to Ken Taylor, who is in the AOC out here, and we are arranging a good time for our arrival in Blighty, and if we meet our other pals who are out here I have no doubt but that our expectations will be fulfilled. I will now draw this short letter to a close, hoping you are in the best of health.

 

 

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